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36

Proizvoda
  • The Artwood series was crafted to produce a traditional as well as a modern guitar. Technology moves forward at a frantic pace and the world of guitar craftsmanship is no different. In producing the Artwood series, we've respected the rich tradition of the acoustic guitar while adding modern interpretations in our continuing search for the ultimate in guitar tone. body shape Dreadnought body bracing X Bracing top Solid Sitka Spruce back & sides Mahogany back and sides neck Mahogany neck fretboard Rosewood bridge Rosewood body binding Ivory back strip inlay Ivory soundhole rosette Abalone tuning machine Chrome Die-cast Tuner w/half moon knobs nut material Bone number of frets 20 saddle material Compensated Bone saddle bridge pins Ibanez Advantage™ Bridge pin strings D'Addario® EXP11 Coated 80/20 Bronze, Light (.012-.053 Gauge) finish top Gloss finish back and sides Gloss finish neck back Satin Neck Dimensions Scale 648mm a : Width at Nut 43mm b : Width at 14th Fret 55mm c : Thickness at 1st 21mm d : Thickness at 7th 22mm Radius 400mmR Body Dimensions a : Length 20" b : Width 15 3/4" c : Max Depth 5"

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    36.125 RSD

    306,35 €

  • The ES-335 guitar is one of the most iconic Gibson instruments ever produced. Loved for its looks and it's versatility it's no wonder Gibson started producing a brother to the guitar model for bass players. This bass will satisfy demand for an ES style bass that has not been produced for over 40 years. It has been updated with a 34" scale and features some standby classics like a rosewood fingerboard, maple neck, traditional ES-335 body and 1961 style maple centerblock. The full size dual humbuckers compliment the long scale and semi hollow body for full yet well defined notes. So if you need a bass with classic looks and plenty of thump this is it. Includes case. 100% American made in Memphis TN Bound body 34" Scale Rosewood fingerboard Maple neck Traditional style peghead and fingerboard inlays Traditional ES-335 body build with 1961 style maple centerblock Dual solid cover humbucking pickups Includes case

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    254.285 RSD

    2.156,4 €

  • Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. History Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. The Byrdland retained the traditional carved solid-spruce arched top and wide dimensions (17”) of big-bodied jazzers like its predecessor the L-5CES, but was considerably thinner, at only 2 1/4” deep. The electric guitar was here to stay, and Gibson’s designers quite rightly determined that a guitar that was intended primarily as an electric—rather than acoustic—instrument should be made in a way that would minimize feedback. Gibson created the Thinline series, which included the Byrdland partnered by the ES-350T, released the same year. Together they constituted the first of the new thin-bodied breed, and launched a design trend for archtop electrics that would proliferate to this day. So successful was its design ethos, that it not only offered a popular alternative for jazz, pop, and country players, it also proved capable of cranking out heavy rock in the hands of guitarists such as Ted Nugent. Body At the request of Billy Byrd and Hank Garland, the Byrdland was made with a reduced scale length, but featured all the finery of a top-of-the-line Gibson archtop guitar. The Byrdland’s super-thin neck and 23 1/2” scale length might have implied a “student model” instrument, but it was intended purely for speed and playing ease, and its five-ply binding, ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlay, gold-plated hardware, and triple-loop Byrdland trapeze tailpiece all single it out as a top-shelf guitar. Hardware Originally offered in 1955 with Alnico V single coil pickups, the Byrdland was upgraded to PAF humbucking pickups in 1957, and that remains its most popular incarnation. Coupled to the traditional independent volume and tone controls and a three-way selector switch, these units gave the Byrdland the ability to produce anything from a smooth mellow purr to a hot, cutting twang. Near-perfect Recreation The instrument produced today by the Gibson Custom Shop offers the finest original-spec rendition of this classic model that has been available since its production of the late 1950s. From the select maple and walnut used in its neck to the high-grade spruce of its top, no expense is spared in making this thinline electric guitar that Hank Garland and Billy Byrd would be proud of. Details such as the pearl flower-pot headstock inlay, multi-ply fingerboard binding, rounded Venetian cutaway or Florentine cutaway (pictured), multi-ply bound pickguard, bound f-holes, and sculpted fingerboard end are all true to classic form. In the electrics department, a pair of Gibson’s popular ’57 Classic humbucking pickups keep it all sounding as good as it looks. Each Byrdland includes a Custom Shop case and Certificate of Authenticity.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.104.690 RSD

    9.368,04 €

  • Ibanez V50NJP Jampack akustični paket. Sve što treba da počnete da svirate. Ibanez V50 Jam Pack uključuje elegantnu futrolu, električni štimer, gitarski kaiš, trzalice i torbicu za potrebštine. Ibanez V50NJP paket vam pruža kvalitet koji očekujete od Ibanez-a po veoma pristupačnoj ceni. Dreadnought gitara Električni štimer Futrola Gitarski kaiš Trzalice Torbica

    Izvor

    www.megamusic.rs
    15.330 RSD

    130 €

  • In the Wes Montgomery, Gibson has created a guitar with inherent quality, versatility, and a rich, impressive appearance. It has gained the highest acclaim from professional musicians. Like the legend whose name it wears, it is destined for history. Guitarists everywhere have sung the praises of the comfortable neck, fast easy action, and quick response. Just like its predecessor, the L-5 CES, the Wes Montgomery has a carved spruce top with highly figured maple back, rims, and a 5-piece maple neck. This model features a '57 Classic reissue humbucking pickup placed in the neck position so that anyone playing it can achieve the Wes tone. One '57 Classic reissue humbucker Gold hardware 25-3/4" scale Ebony fingerboard 20 frets Trapeze inlay Custom multi-ply black/white/black binding Carved spruce top

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.144.733 RSD

    9.707,62 €

  • Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. History Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. The Byrdland retained the traditional carved solid-spruce arched top and wide dimensions (17”) of big-bodied jazzers like its predecessor the L-5CES, but was considerably thinner, at only 2 1/4” deep. The electric guitar was here to stay, and Gibson’s designers quite rightly determined that a guitar that was intended primarily as an electric—rather than acoustic—instrument should be made in a way that would minimize feedback. Gibson created the Thinline series, which included the Byrdland partnered by the ES-350T, released the same year. Together they constituted the first of the new thin-bodied breed, and launched a design trend for archtop electrics that would proliferate to this day. So successful was its design ethos, that it not only offered a popular alternative for jazz, pop, and country players, it also proved capable of cranking out heavy rock in the hands of guitarists such as Ted Nugent. Body At the request of Billy Byrd and Hank Garland, the Byrdland was made with a reduced scale length, but featured all the finery of a top-of-the-line Gibson archtop guitar. The Byrdland’s super-thin neck and 23 1/2” scale length might have implied a “student model” instrument, but it was intended purely for speed and playing ease, and its five-ply binding, ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlay, gold-plated hardware, and triple-loop Byrdland trapeze tailpiece all single it out as a top-shelf guitar. Hardware Originally offered in 1955 with Alnico V single coil pickups, the Byrdland was upgraded to PAF humbucking pickups in 1957, and that remains its most popular incarnation. Coupled to the traditional independent volume and tone controls and a three-way selector switch, these units gave the Byrdland the ability to produce anything from a smooth mellow purr to a hot, cutting twang. Near-perfect Recreation The instrument produced today by the Gibson Custom Shop offers the finest original-spec rendition of this classic model that has been available since its production of the late 1950s. From the select maple and walnut used in its neck to the high-grade spruce of its top, no expense is spared in making this thinline electric guitar that Hank Garland and Billy Byrd would be proud of. Details such as the pearl flower-pot headstock inlay, multi-ply fingerboard binding, rounded Venetian cutaway or Florentine cutaway (pictured), multi-ply bound pickguard, bound f-holes, and sculpted fingerboard end are all true to classic form. In the electrics department, a pair of Gibson’s popular ’57 Classic humbucking pickups keep it all sounding as good as it looks. Each Byrdland includes a Custom Shop case and Certificate of Authenticity.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.134.779 RSD

    9.623,21 €

  • There are few guitars as important to the history and development of Gibson as a major manufacturer of six-stringed instruments as the Super 400 and Super 400-CES. The model first appeared in 1934 as an archtop acoustic with no cutaway, simply named the Super 400. As it was then – and still remains today in the Super 400-CES – the Super 400 was the largest guitar the company had ever produced, with an astounding body width of 18 inches. But as Gibson has evolved over the years to adapt to the industry’s ever-changing advancements, so have its Super 400s. The earliest Super 400 models were quite similar to Gibson’s other archtop acoustic, the L-5, and featured a hand-engraved tailpiece and hand-engraved finger rest support, along with an “L-5 Super” truss rod cover. In 1939, the guitar underwent several changes that still remain with it today, including an enlarged upper bout, a new tailpiece similar to the one on the L-5, enlarged f-holes and a venetian cutaway option that is now a standard feature. Although the Super 400s were discontinued during the mid-1940s because of the supply shortages of WWII, Gibson reintroduced the model in 1949. And as Gibson strived to gain an upper hand in the electric guitar market in the early 1950s, the model continued to progress with the eventual introduction of the first electric version. History There are few guitars as important to the history and development of Gibson as a major manufacturer of six-stringed instruments as the Super 400 and Super 400-CES. The model first appeared in 1934 as an archtop acoustic with no cutaway, simply named the Super 400. As it was then – and still remains today in the Super 400-CES – the Super 400 was the largest guitar the company had ever produced, with an astounding body width of 18 inches. But as Gibson has evolved over the years to adapt to the industry’s ever-changing advancements, so have its Super 400s. The earliest Super 400 models were quite similar to Gibson’s other archtop acoustic, the L-5, and featured a hand-engraved tailpiece and hand-engraved finger rest support, along with an “L-5 Super” truss rod cover. In 1939, the guitar underwent several changes that still remain with it today, including an enlarged upper bout, a new tailpiece similar to the one on the L-5, enlarged f-holes and a venetian cutaway option that is now a standard feature. Although the Super 400s were discontinued during the mid-1940s because of the supply shortages of WWII, Gibson reintroduced the model in 1949. And as Gibson strived to gain an upper hand in the electric guitar market in the early 1950s, the model continued to progress with the eventual introduction of the first electric version. The First Super 400s The Super 400-CES of 1951 featured a pair of Gibson’s legendary P-90 single coil pickups, and while a few Super 400s had been previously custom ordered with the P-90s, the new model was the first dual-pickup production model in the Gibson line, equipped with individual volume and tone controls for each pickup and a three-way toggle switch for switching between pickups. The next significant changes occurred in two years later when the model was upgraded with two of Gibson’s Alnico pickups, although a few continued to be produced with the original P-90s until the stock was depleted. Gibson’s revolutionary Tune-o-matic bridge also made its first appearance on the Super 400-CES in 1953. Today's Super 400-CES Gibson’s pioneering humbucker pickups, which were also being fitted on the ES-175 and Les Paul Goldtop models, began to appear in earnest on the Super 400-CES in November of 1957. And while several subtle changes were made to the model during the mid-1960s, the Super 400-CES model of the late 1950s is the one faithfully recreated today by the skilled craftsmen of Gibson Custom. The body of the Super 400-CES remains the largest produced by Gibson today, with the following dimensions: 18 (W) X 21¾ (L) X 3⅜ (D). Its top is crafted from high-grade spruce, with high-grade maple used for the back and sides. The body is then adorned with multi-ply black and white binding on both the top and back, with single-ply white binding around the f-holes. The gold hardware includes an ABR-1 bridge with a base made from ebony, and Gibson’s period-correct L-5 tailpiece. The 25½-inch scale length neck is a five-piece neck made primarily from high-grade maple, with two streamers made from high-grade walnut, resulting in one of the most stunning neck designs in the history of Gibson Custom. Traditional Appointments The eye-catching neck is topped by a 20-fret ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlays and multi-ply black and white binding, then hand-fitted with Gibson’s traditional ES-rounded neck profile. The pickups are a pair of Gibson’s legendary ’57 Classics, which faithfully capture the unique and subtle variations between coil windings of the original “Patent Applied For” humbuckers of the late 1950s, delivering a warm and full tone with a balanced response. Other appointments include Gibson’s traditional five-piece split diamond motif inlay on the headstock and Schaller M6 tuners. The guitar is available in Vintage Sunburst and Natural finishes, just as they were offered in 1959. They also come with a Gibson Custom case and certificate of authenticity.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.646.968 RSD

    13.966,69 €

  • The Casino Coupe is the legendary Casino reborn in an ES-339 body size. It’s a racecar-sized, super slick coupe version of the legendary hollowbody that since its release in 1961, has been a favorite of tone connoisseurs from Keith Richards to The Beatles, to GRAMMY winner Gary Clark Jr. The new Epiphone Casino Coupe has all of the Casino’s trademark tone features--from neck size to tone woods to pickups--but in a “Coupe” size for easy travel. Now you can play the legendary archtop in a smaller size without a smaller sound. Body Laminated Maple 5-layer Top Laminated Maple 5-layer Neck Mahogany Neck Shape 1960s SlimTaper™ Neck Joint Set-neck Scale Length 24.75” Fingerboard Material Rosewood Fingerboard Inlays Parallelogram Pearloid inlays Fingerboard Radius 12” Frets 22 medium jumbo Neck Pickup Epiphone P90R Bridge Pickup Epiphone P90T Controls Neck volume Neck Tone Bridge Volume Bridge Tone Pickup Selector 3-way Epiphone toggle Nut Imitation Bone Nut Width 1.68” Binding Body Top: Ivory 1-layer Body Back: Ivory 1-layer Hardware Nickel Headstock Logo Vintage Epiphone in Pearloid Truss Rod Cover Bullet shape with black/white 2-layer Truss Rod Cover Logo Historic “E” in while silkprint Machine Heads “Deluxe” with small metal buttons 14:1 ratio Knobs Top Hat with metal inserts and pointers Headstock Sloped Dovewing with 14 degree angle Bridge LockTone™ Tune-o-matic Tailpiece Coupe Trapeze Strap Buttons Yes Sound Hole Label 1960s style orange oval Pickguard PVC white and black 3-layer Pickguard Logo Historic metal “E” Output ¼” Epiphone Heady Duty non-rotating Includes Guitar User’s Manual Truss Rod Wrench

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    55.880 RSD

    473,88 €

  • The world most sold electric acoustic guitar, 500 series now reveals its upgraded version. Top Spruce Back Nato / Okume Side Nato / Okume Neck Nato Fingerboard Rosewood Body Depth 95-115mm (3 3/4" - 4 1/4") Nut Width 43mm (1 11/16") String Length 650mm (25 9/16") Tuners Die-Cast Chrome Preamp System 66 Bridge Rosewood

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    50.891 RSD

    431,57 €

  • Pick up the Gibson Memphis ES-390 hollowbody electric guitar, and your playing will be instantly inspired. Even before you plug into your amplifier, this guitar sings. The ES-390 sports the true hollowbody construction of an ES-330, in the lightweight body size of Gibson's ES-339. The ultra-comfortable historic neck profile has been slimmed down a bit for even faster, smoother playability. And with dual Mini Humbuckers, you'll find it easy to dial in iconic hollowbody tones with the Gibson Memphis ES-390 electric guitar. Left-/Right-handed Right-handed Body Material Figured Maple Top Material Figureed Maple Body Finish Nitrocellulose Color Vintage Sunburst Neck Material Mahogany Fingerboard Material Hand-Selected Dark Rosewood, 12" Radius Fingerboard Inlay Pearloid Blocks Number of Frets 22 Nut Width 1.675" Bridge/Tailpiece Tune-o-Matic Bridge, Trapeze Tailpiece Tuners TonePros Kluson, 15:01 Number of Pickups 2 Neck Pickup Mini Humbucker (Alnico II) Bridge Pickup Mini Humbucker (Alnico II) Controls 2 x Volume, 2 x Tone Strings Genuine Gibson Strings, (.010-.046)

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    350.885 RSD

    2.975,59 €

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Proizvoda