Pretraži oglase
Učitavam pretragu,

molimo sačekajte...

Ceger.rs je pretraživač proizvoda. Da bi ste otišli na sajt prodavce kliknite na proizvod.
  • Tag

    Hollow body električne gitare

13

Proizvoda
  • 1
  • 2
  • Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. History Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. The Byrdland retained the traditional carved solid-spruce arched top and wide dimensions (17”) of big-bodied jazzers like its predecessor the L-5CES, but was considerably thinner, at only 2 1/4” deep. The electric guitar was here to stay, and Gibson’s designers quite rightly determined that a guitar that was intended primarily as an electric—rather than acoustic—instrument should be made in a way that would minimize feedback. Gibson created the Thinline series, which included the Byrdland partnered by the ES-350T, released the same year. Together they constituted the first of the new thin-bodied breed, and launched a design trend for archtop electrics that would proliferate to this day. So successful was its design ethos, that it not only offered a popular alternative for jazz, pop, and country players, it also proved capable of cranking out heavy rock in the hands of guitarists such as Ted Nugent. Body At the request of Billy Byrd and Hank Garland, the Byrdland was made with a reduced scale length, but featured all the finery of a top-of-the-line Gibson archtop guitar. The Byrdland’s super-thin neck and 23 1/2” scale length might have implied a “student model” instrument, but it was intended purely for speed and playing ease, and its five-ply binding, ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlay, gold-plated hardware, and triple-loop Byrdland trapeze tailpiece all single it out as a top-shelf guitar. Hardware Originally offered in 1955 with Alnico V single coil pickups, the Byrdland was upgraded to PAF humbucking pickups in 1957, and that remains its most popular incarnation. Coupled to the traditional independent volume and tone controls and a three-way selector switch, these units gave the Byrdland the ability to produce anything from a smooth mellow purr to a hot, cutting twang. Near-perfect Recreation The instrument produced today by the Gibson Custom Shop offers the finest original-spec rendition of this classic model that has been available since its production of the late 1950s. From the select maple and walnut used in its neck to the high-grade spruce of its top, no expense is spared in making this thinline electric guitar that Hank Garland and Billy Byrd would be proud of. Details such as the pearl flower-pot headstock inlay, multi-ply fingerboard binding, rounded Venetian cutaway or Florentine cutaway (pictured), multi-ply bound pickguard, bound f-holes, and sculpted fingerboard end are all true to classic form. In the electrics department, a pair of Gibson’s popular ’57 Classic humbucking pickups keep it all sounding as good as it looks. Each Byrdland includes a Custom Shop case and Certificate of Authenticity.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.104.690 RSD

    9.368,04 €

  • In the Wes Montgomery, Gibson has created a guitar with inherent quality, versatility, and a rich, impressive appearance. It has gained the highest acclaim from professional musicians. Like the legend whose name it wears, it is destined for history. Guitarists everywhere have sung the praises of the comfortable neck, fast easy action, and quick response. Just like its predecessor, the L-5 CES, the Wes Montgomery has a carved spruce top with highly figured maple back, rims, and a 5-piece maple neck. This model features a '57 Classic reissue humbucking pickup placed in the neck position so that anyone playing it can achieve the Wes tone. One '57 Classic reissue humbucker Gold hardware 25-3/4" scale Ebony fingerboard 20 frets Trapeze inlay Custom multi-ply black/white/black binding Carved spruce top

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.144.733 RSD

    9.707,62 €

  • Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. History Many working musicians of the fast-paced and musically adventurous ’50s required a new instrument — one that captured traditional Gibson archtop artistry and craftsmanship, but represented a redrawing of the blueprint for the needs of the day. Enter the Byrdland, released in 1955 after consultation with first-call Nashville session musicians Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Outwardly every bit a Gibson, this model represented a handful of developments that were radical, even revolutionary, in its day. The Byrdland retained the traditional carved solid-spruce arched top and wide dimensions (17”) of big-bodied jazzers like its predecessor the L-5CES, but was considerably thinner, at only 2 1/4” deep. The electric guitar was here to stay, and Gibson’s designers quite rightly determined that a guitar that was intended primarily as an electric—rather than acoustic—instrument should be made in a way that would minimize feedback. Gibson created the Thinline series, which included the Byrdland partnered by the ES-350T, released the same year. Together they constituted the first of the new thin-bodied breed, and launched a design trend for archtop electrics that would proliferate to this day. So successful was its design ethos, that it not only offered a popular alternative for jazz, pop, and country players, it also proved capable of cranking out heavy rock in the hands of guitarists such as Ted Nugent. Body At the request of Billy Byrd and Hank Garland, the Byrdland was made with a reduced scale length, but featured all the finery of a top-of-the-line Gibson archtop guitar. The Byrdland’s super-thin neck and 23 1/2” scale length might have implied a “student model” instrument, but it was intended purely for speed and playing ease, and its five-ply binding, ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlay, gold-plated hardware, and triple-loop Byrdland trapeze tailpiece all single it out as a top-shelf guitar. Hardware Originally offered in 1955 with Alnico V single coil pickups, the Byrdland was upgraded to PAF humbucking pickups in 1957, and that remains its most popular incarnation. Coupled to the traditional independent volume and tone controls and a three-way selector switch, these units gave the Byrdland the ability to produce anything from a smooth mellow purr to a hot, cutting twang. Near-perfect Recreation The instrument produced today by the Gibson Custom Shop offers the finest original-spec rendition of this classic model that has been available since its production of the late 1950s. From the select maple and walnut used in its neck to the high-grade spruce of its top, no expense is spared in making this thinline electric guitar that Hank Garland and Billy Byrd would be proud of. Details such as the pearl flower-pot headstock inlay, multi-ply fingerboard binding, rounded Venetian cutaway or Florentine cutaway (pictured), multi-ply bound pickguard, bound f-holes, and sculpted fingerboard end are all true to classic form. In the electrics department, a pair of Gibson’s popular ’57 Classic humbucking pickups keep it all sounding as good as it looks. Each Byrdland includes a Custom Shop case and Certificate of Authenticity.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.134.779 RSD

    9.623,21 €

  • There are few guitars as important to the history and development of Gibson as a major manufacturer of six-stringed instruments as the Super 400 and Super 400-CES. The model first appeared in 1934 as an archtop acoustic with no cutaway, simply named the Super 400. As it was then – and still remains today in the Super 400-CES – the Super 400 was the largest guitar the company had ever produced, with an astounding body width of 18 inches. But as Gibson has evolved over the years to adapt to the industry’s ever-changing advancements, so have its Super 400s. The earliest Super 400 models were quite similar to Gibson’s other archtop acoustic, the L-5, and featured a hand-engraved tailpiece and hand-engraved finger rest support, along with an “L-5 Super” truss rod cover. In 1939, the guitar underwent several changes that still remain with it today, including an enlarged upper bout, a new tailpiece similar to the one on the L-5, enlarged f-holes and a venetian cutaway option that is now a standard feature. Although the Super 400s were discontinued during the mid-1940s because of the supply shortages of WWII, Gibson reintroduced the model in 1949. And as Gibson strived to gain an upper hand in the electric guitar market in the early 1950s, the model continued to progress with the eventual introduction of the first electric version. History There are few guitars as important to the history and development of Gibson as a major manufacturer of six-stringed instruments as the Super 400 and Super 400-CES. The model first appeared in 1934 as an archtop acoustic with no cutaway, simply named the Super 400. As it was then – and still remains today in the Super 400-CES – the Super 400 was the largest guitar the company had ever produced, with an astounding body width of 18 inches. But as Gibson has evolved over the years to adapt to the industry’s ever-changing advancements, so have its Super 400s. The earliest Super 400 models were quite similar to Gibson’s other archtop acoustic, the L-5, and featured a hand-engraved tailpiece and hand-engraved finger rest support, along with an “L-5 Super” truss rod cover. In 1939, the guitar underwent several changes that still remain with it today, including an enlarged upper bout, a new tailpiece similar to the one on the L-5, enlarged f-holes and a venetian cutaway option that is now a standard feature. Although the Super 400s were discontinued during the mid-1940s because of the supply shortages of WWII, Gibson reintroduced the model in 1949. And as Gibson strived to gain an upper hand in the electric guitar market in the early 1950s, the model continued to progress with the eventual introduction of the first electric version. The First Super 400s The Super 400-CES of 1951 featured a pair of Gibson’s legendary P-90 single coil pickups, and while a few Super 400s had been previously custom ordered with the P-90s, the new model was the first dual-pickup production model in the Gibson line, equipped with individual volume and tone controls for each pickup and a three-way toggle switch for switching between pickups. The next significant changes occurred in two years later when the model was upgraded with two of Gibson’s Alnico pickups, although a few continued to be produced with the original P-90s until the stock was depleted. Gibson’s revolutionary Tune-o-matic bridge also made its first appearance on the Super 400-CES in 1953. Today's Super 400-CES Gibson’s pioneering humbucker pickups, which were also being fitted on the ES-175 and Les Paul Goldtop models, began to appear in earnest on the Super 400-CES in November of 1957. And while several subtle changes were made to the model during the mid-1960s, the Super 400-CES model of the late 1950s is the one faithfully recreated today by the skilled craftsmen of Gibson Custom. The body of the Super 400-CES remains the largest produced by Gibson today, with the following dimensions: 18 (W) X 21¾ (L) X 3⅜ (D). Its top is crafted from high-grade spruce, with high-grade maple used for the back and sides. The body is then adorned with multi-ply black and white binding on both the top and back, with single-ply white binding around the f-holes. The gold hardware includes an ABR-1 bridge with a base made from ebony, and Gibson’s period-correct L-5 tailpiece. The 25½-inch scale length neck is a five-piece neck made primarily from high-grade maple, with two streamers made from high-grade walnut, resulting in one of the most stunning neck designs in the history of Gibson Custom. Traditional Appointments The eye-catching neck is topped by a 20-fret ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlays and multi-ply black and white binding, then hand-fitted with Gibson’s traditional ES-rounded neck profile. The pickups are a pair of Gibson’s legendary ’57 Classics, which faithfully capture the unique and subtle variations between coil windings of the original “Patent Applied For” humbuckers of the late 1950s, delivering a warm and full tone with a balanced response. Other appointments include Gibson’s traditional five-piece split diamond motif inlay on the headstock and Schaller M6 tuners. The guitar is available in Vintage Sunburst and Natural finishes, just as they were offered in 1959. They also come with a Gibson Custom case and certificate of authenticity.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.646.968 RSD

    13.966,69 €

  • The Casino Coupe is the legendary Casino reborn in an ES-339 body size. It’s a racecar-sized, super slick coupe version of the legendary hollowbody that since its release in 1961, has been a favorite of tone connoisseurs from Keith Richards to The Beatles, to GRAMMY winner Gary Clark Jr. The new Epiphone Casino Coupe has all of the Casino’s trademark tone features--from neck size to tone woods to pickups--but in a “Coupe” size for easy travel. Now you can play the legendary archtop in a smaller size without a smaller sound. Body Laminated Maple 5-layer Top Laminated Maple 5-layer Neck Mahogany Neck Shape 1960s SlimTaper™ Neck Joint Set-neck Scale Length 24.75” Fingerboard Material Rosewood Fingerboard Inlays Parallelogram Pearloid inlays Fingerboard Radius 12” Frets 22 medium jumbo Neck Pickup Epiphone P90R Bridge Pickup Epiphone P90T Controls Neck volume Neck Tone Bridge Volume Bridge Tone Pickup Selector 3-way Epiphone toggle Nut Imitation Bone Nut Width 1.68” Binding Body Top: Ivory 1-layer Body Back: Ivory 1-layer Hardware Nickel Headstock Logo Vintage Epiphone in Pearloid Truss Rod Cover Bullet shape with black/white 2-layer Truss Rod Cover Logo Historic “E” in while silkprint Machine Heads “Deluxe” with small metal buttons 14:1 ratio Knobs Top Hat with metal inserts and pointers Headstock Sloped Dovewing with 14 degree angle Bridge LockTone™ Tune-o-matic Tailpiece Coupe Trapeze Strap Buttons Yes Sound Hole Label 1960s style orange oval Pickguard PVC white and black 3-layer Pickguard Logo Historic metal “E” Output ¼” Epiphone Heady Duty non-rotating Includes Guitar User’s Manual Truss Rod Wrench

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    55.880 RSD

    473,88 €

  • Pick up the Gibson Memphis ES-390 hollowbody electric guitar, and your playing will be instantly inspired. Even before you plug into your amplifier, this guitar sings. The ES-390 sports the true hollowbody construction of an ES-330, in the lightweight body size of Gibson's ES-339. The ultra-comfortable historic neck profile has been slimmed down a bit for even faster, smoother playability. And with dual Mini Humbuckers, you'll find it easy to dial in iconic hollowbody tones with the Gibson Memphis ES-390 electric guitar. Left-/Right-handed Right-handed Body Material Figured Maple Top Material Figureed Maple Body Finish Nitrocellulose Color Vintage Sunburst Neck Material Mahogany Fingerboard Material Hand-Selected Dark Rosewood, 12" Radius Fingerboard Inlay Pearloid Blocks Number of Frets 22 Nut Width 1.675" Bridge/Tailpiece Tune-o-Matic Bridge, Trapeze Tailpiece Tuners TonePros Kluson, 15:01 Number of Pickups 2 Neck Pickup Mini Humbucker (Alnico II) Bridge Pickup Mini Humbucker (Alnico II) Controls 2 x Volume, 2 x Tone Strings Genuine Gibson Strings, (.010-.046)

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    350.885 RSD

    2.975,59 €

  • Initially produced as an acoustic in 1922 under the direction of famed Gibson luthier Lloyd Loar, the L-5 was Gibson’s first guitar with f-holes. In the 1940s the model became the rhythm box of choice for big band players and later the standard guitar for Wes Montgomery, who would eventually receive a custom model. And it was already one of the world’s most popular guitars when Gibson first electrified the model in 1951. Gibson put a pair of P-90 single-coil pickups and a rosewood bridge on the first 31 L-5 CES models to emerge from the original Kalamazoo plant in ’51. Although the guitars never went into high production, the company’s engineers continued to work on numerous modifications. In 1958, 21 examples of the classic version of the L-5 CES that’s produced today by Gibson’s Custom Shop emerged, beefed up with two humbucking pickups and an ABR-1 bridge. History Initially produced as an acoustic in 1922 under the direction of famed Gibson luthier Lloyd Loar, the L-5 was Gibson’s first guitar with f-holes. In the 1940s the model became the rhythm box of choice for big band players and later the standard guitar for Wes Montgomery, who would eventually receive a custom model. And it was already one of the world’s most popular guitars when Gibson first electrified the model in 1951. Gibson put a pair of P-90 single-coil pickups and a rosewood bridge on the first 31 L-5 CES models to emerge from the original Kalamazoo plant in ’51. Although the guitars never went into high production, the company’s engineers continued to work on numerous modifications. In 1958, 21 examples of the classic version of the L-5 CES that’s produced today by Gibson’s Custom Shop emerged, beefed up with two humbucking pickups and an ABR-1 bridge. Body and Neck Today’s Custom Shop L-5 CES is a truly classic instrument. Its appearance is both imposing and graceful, with a stylish single cutaway, block inlays, and artfully crafted headstock. The headstock is itself a work of art, bearing a pearl inlay inspired by the urns of ancient Greece. Available in wine red, ebony, natural, and vintage sunburst finishes, the L-5 CES has a high-grade spruce top and maple back and rims. Its body is a substantial 17-inches wide, 21-inches long, and 3 3/8-inches deep – dimensions key to its rich, dark, woody tones. Multi-ply binding in black or white accents the top and back, and single-ply white binding outlines the f-holes The guitar’s neck is made of high-grade maple and walnut supporting a 20-fret ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlays and multi-ply black or white binding. The ES rounded profile neck has a 25 1/2-inch scale length with a 1 11/16-inch width at the nut. Hardware The electronics array is pure Gibson, with two ’57 Classic humbucking pickups, two volume knobs, two tone knobs, and a three-way selector switch. The Custom Shop’s L-5 CES is outfitted in all gold hardware and features Schaller M6s tuners. The instrument’s ABR-1 bridge has an ebony base and there’s an artfully rendered L-5 trapeze tailpiece. Each L-5 CES comes strung with Gibson L-5 Electric .012 strings in a Custom Shop case with a certificate of authenticity – testimony to the origin of an instrument that’s truly world class. Famous Players Country legend Mother Maybelle Carter and jazzman Eddie Lang made this guitar their own and used it on multiple recordings. A host of other famed guitarists have used the L-5 CES over the decades, including Wes Montgomery, Scotty Moore, Tuck Andress, Pat Martino, Lee Ritenour, Eric Clapton, Paul Simon, Keith Richards, and Ron Wood. Django Reinhardt had even experimenting with electrifying the L-5 before Gibson unveiled the L-5 CES in 1951.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.275.270 RSD

    10.814,6 €

  • The Gibson L-4 archtop became jazz’s greatest rhythm instrument in the hands of six-string innovators like the virtuoso Eddie Lang in the 1920s and assured the company’s dominance of the guitar market even before the outbreak of World War I. But the L-4’s story - how it evolved from an acoustic guitar to the dynamic L-4 CES Mahogany Archtop of today - is perhaps the best illustration of Gibson’s historic dedication to endlessly refining and improving instruments that are already world class. Solid spruce carved top with f-holes Carved solid mahogany back and sides One-piece mahogany neck Ebony fretboard with pearl parallelogram inlays Multi-ply binding on top, single binding on neck and back Gold hardware 2 - '57 Classic Humbucker pickups ABR-1 Tune-O-Matic bridge with gold-plated brass tailpiece

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    823.484 RSD

    6.983,35 €

  • Initially produced as an acoustic in 1922 under the direction of famed Gibson luthier Lloyd Loar, the L-5 was Gibson’s first guitar with f-holes. In the 1940s the model became the rhythm box of choice for big band players and later the standard guitar for Wes Montgomery, who would eventually receive a custom model. And it was already one of the world’s most popular guitars when Gibson first electrified the model in 1951. Gibson put a pair of P-90 single-coil pickups and a rosewood bridge on the first 31 L-5 CES models to emerge from the original Kalamazoo plant in ’51. Although the guitars never went into high production, the company’s engineers continued to work on numerous modifications. In 1958, 21 examples of the classic version of the L-5 CES that’s produced today by Gibson’s Custom Shop emerged, beefed up with two humbucking pickups and an ABR-1 bridge. History Initially produced as an acoustic in 1922 under the direction of famed Gibson luthier Lloyd Loar, the L-5 was Gibson’s first guitar with f-holes. In the 1940s the model became the rhythm box of choice for big band players and later the standard guitar for Wes Montgomery, who would eventually receive a custom model. And it was already one of the world’s most popular guitars when Gibson first electrified the model in 1951. Gibson put a pair of P-90 single-coil pickups and a rosewood bridge on the first 31 L-5 CES models to emerge from the original Kalamazoo plant in ’51. Although the guitars never went into high production, the company’s engineers continued to work on numerous modifications. In 1958, 21 examples of the classic version of the L-5 CES that’s produced today by Gibson’s Custom Shop emerged, beefed up with two humbucking pickups and an ABR-1 bridge. Body and Neck Today’s Custom Shop L-5 CES is a truly classic instrument. Its appearance is both imposing and graceful, with a stylish single cutaway, block inlays, and artfully crafted headstock. The headstock is itself a work of art, bearing a pearl inlay inspired by the urns of ancient Greece. Available in wine red, ebony, natural, and vintage sunburst finishes, the L-5 CES has a high-grade spruce top and maple back and rims. Its body is a substantial 17-inches wide, 21-inches long, and 3 3/8-inches deep – dimensions key to its rich, dark, woody tones. Multi-ply binding in black or white accents the top and back, and single-ply white binding outlines the f-holes The guitar’s neck is made of high-grade maple and walnut supporting a 20-fret ebony fingerboard with pearl block inlays and multi-ply black or white binding. The ES rounded profile neck has a 25 1/2-inch scale length with a 1 11/16-inch width at the nut. Hardware The electronics array is pure Gibson, with two ’57 Classic humbucking pickups, two volume knobs, two tone knobs, and a three-way selector switch. The Custom Shop’s L-5 CES is outfitted in all gold hardware and features Schaller M6s tuners. The instrument’s ABR-1 bridge has an ebony base and there’s an artfully rendered L-5 trapeze tailpiece. Each L-5 CES comes strung with Gibson L-5 Electric .012 strings in a Custom Shop case with a certificate of authenticity – testimony to the origin of an instrument that’s truly world class. Famous Players Country legend Mother Maybelle Carter and jazzman Eddie Lang made this guitar their own and used it on multiple recordings. A host of other famed guitarists have used the L-5 CES over the decades, including Wes Montgomery, Scotty Moore, Tuck Andress, Pat Martino, Lee Ritenour, Eric Clapton, Paul Simon, Keith Richards, and Ron Wood. Django Reinhardt had even experimenting with electrifying the L-5 before Gibson unveiled the L-5 CES in 1951.

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    1.245.181 RSD

    10.559,44 €

  • The Gibson ES-335 12-String Electric Guitar is available now, but in a very limited supply. If you're looking for gorgeous chiming sounds that can only come from a 12-string ES-335, then you've found it here. The clouds part, the planets align and the graceful notes flow into the hearts of everyone who hears. It features 1961 style ES-335 body construction and displays a vintage look with 1960's styled inlays. It sports a comfortable neck that's 1.75” at the nut. BurstBucker 1 and 2 pickups get that “Jangly” 12 string sound with splittable coils via push/pull pots. Includes case. 100% American made in Memphis TN . 1961 style ES-335 body construction Comfortable neck 1,75” at the nut Burst Bucker 1 and 2 pickups with splittable coils via push/pull pots Vintage look with ‘60s styled inlays Gold with Silver insert knobs on Vintage Sunburst Black with Silver insert knobs on Antique Cherry Includes hardshell case

    Izvor

    www.mitrosmusic.com
    333.239 RSD

    2.825,95 €

13

Proizvoda
  • 1
  • 2